Abstract

Accuracy of Self-Reported Vaccination Status in a Cohort of Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Dig Dis Sci. 2020 Sep 29;1-7. doi: 10.1007/s10620-020-06631-6. Online ahead of print.

Ryan Smith 1, Jeffery Hubers 2, Francis A Farraye 3, Emmanuel Sampene 4, Mary S Hayney 5, Freddy Caldera 6

 
     

Author information

  • 1Department of Medicine, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI, USA.
  • 2Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, 1685 Highland Avenue, Room 4240-01A MFCB, Madison, WI, 53705, USA.
  • 3Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL, USA.
  • 4Department of Biostatics and Medical Informatics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, USA.
  • 5University of Wisconsin School of Pharmacy, Madison, WI, USA.
  • 6Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, 1685 Highland Avenue, Room 4240-01A MFCB, Madison, WI, 53705, USA. fcaldera@medicine.wisc.edu.

Abstract

Background and aims: Prevention of vaccine-preventable diseases is important in the care of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Thus, accurate immunization histories are critical. Many providers rely on patient self-report when assessing immunization status. The primary aim of our study was to determine the accuracy of self-reported influenza vaccination status in a cohort of patients with IBD.

Methods: We conducted a prospective study of patients with IBD who answered a vaccination status questionnaire and compared their responses to the Wisconsin Immunization Registry, a state-wide electronic immunization information system. The primary outcome was the sensitivity and specificity of self-reported influenza vaccination status. A secondary outcome evaluated the sensitivity and specificity of pneumococcal vaccination status.

Results: A total of 200 patients with IBD were included in the study. Documented immunization rates were 74.5% for influenza vaccinations and 79.9% for pneumococcal vaccinations. Influenza vaccination self-report had a sensitivity of 98.7%, a specificity of 90.2%, a positive predictive value (PPV) of 96.7% and a negative predictive value (NPV) of 95.8%. In comparison, the sensitivity for pneumococcal vaccination was 83.5% with a specificity of 86.2%, PPV of 96.4%, and NPV of 54.3%.

Conclusions: Self-reported influenza immunization status is sensitive and specific in patients with IBD. Accuracy for pneumococcal vaccination is slightly lower, but responses were notable for a high PPV. Self-report is an effective way to determine influenza immunization status and provides useful information for receipt of pneumococcal vaccine in patients with IBD.

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