Abstract

Wearable Devices Are Well Accepted by Patients in the Study and Management of Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Survey Study

Dig Dis Sci. 2020 Jul 23. doi: 10.1007/s10620-020-06493-y. Online ahead of print.

Robert P Hirten 1, Stephanie Stanley 2, Matteo Danieletto 3 4, Zachary Borman 2, Ari Grinspan 2, Prameela Rao 5, Jenny Sauk 6, Lin Chang 7, Bert Arnrich 3, Erwin B?ttinger 3, Laurie Keefer 2, Bruce E Sands 2

 
     

Author information

  • 1The Dr. Henry D. Janowitz Division of Gastroenterology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, 1468 Madison Avenue, Annenberg Building RM 5-12, New York, NY, 10029, USA. robert.hirten@mountsinai.org.
  • 2The Dr. Henry D. Janowitz Division of Gastroenterology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, 1468 Madison Avenue, Annenberg Building RM 5-12, New York, NY, 10029, USA.
  • 3Hasso Plattner Institute for Digital Health at Mount Sinai, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, 10032, USA.
  • 4Department of Genetics and Genomic Sciences, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, 10032, USA.
  • 5Division of Gastroenterology, James J. Peters VA Medical Center, 130 W Kingsbridge Road, Bronx, NY, 10468, USA.
  • 6Vatche and Tamar Manoukian Division of Digestive Diseases, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, 100 UCLA Medical Plaza, Suite 345, Los Angeles, CA, 90095, USA.
  • 7Vatche and Tamar Manoukian Division of Digestive Diseases, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, 100 UCLA Medical Plaza, Suite 205, Los Angeles, CA, 90095, USA.

Abstract

Background: Wearable devices are designed to capture health-related and physiological data. They may be able to improve inflammatory bowel disease management and address evolving research needs. Little is known about patient perceptions for their use in the study and management of inflammatory bowel disease.

Aims: The aim of this survey study is to understand patient preferences and interest in wearable technology.

Methods: Consecutive adult patients who self-reported having inflammatory bowel disease were approached at the Susan and Leonard Feinstein Inflammatory Bowel Disease Center at the Mount Sinai Hospital to complete a 28-question survey. Reponses were analyzed with descriptive statistics. The Pearson Chi-square test and Fischer's exact test were used to determine the association between demographic and disease-related features and survey responses.

Results: Four hundred subjects completed the survey. 42.7% of subjects reported prior or current use of wearable devices. 89.0% of subjects believed that wearable devices can provide important information about their health, while 93.8% reported that they would use a wearable device if it could help their doctor manage their IBD. Subjects identified wrist-worn devices as the preferred device type and a willingness to wear these devices at least daily.

Conclusions: Patients with inflammatory bowel disease believe that wearable devices can provide important information about their health and report a willingness to wear them frequently in research studies and as part the routine management of inflammatory bowel disease.

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