Abstract

New options for managing fecal incontinence in women

JAAPA. 2020 Aug;33(8):50-52. doi: 10.1097/01.JAA.0000684168.68881.61.

Amanda P Stanton 1, Anita H Chen

 
     

Author information

  • 1Amanda P. Stanton practices in the Department of Medical and Surgical Gynecology at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Fla., and is an instructor of obstetrics and gynecology at Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and Science. Anita H. Chen is a consultant at Mayo Clinic in Florida and an assistant professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and Science. The authors have disclosed no potential conflicts of interest, financial or otherwise.

Abstract

Fecal incontinence often is underreported and can be associated with both social embarrassment and isolation. As patients often do not proactively discuss their symptoms, healthcare providers should screen for this distressing condition. The cause of fecal incontinence often is multifactorial, so no single therapy can guarantee perfect, risk-free outcomes. This article reviews the limited therapies for managing fecal incontinence, including a minimally invasive vaginal control device that may offer hope for managing fecal incontinence in women.

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