Abstract

Trends in Anemia, Iron, Therapy, and Transfusion in Hospitalized Pediatric Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease

J Pediatr. 2020 Jul;222:141-145.e1. doi: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2020.02.071. Epub 2020 May 20.

Amanda E Jacobson-Kelly 1, Joseph R Stanek 1, Jacquelyn M Powers 2, Jennifer L Dotson 3, Sarah H O'Brien 4

 
     

Author information

1Division of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, Nationwide Children's Hospital/The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH.

2Section of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine; Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, TX.

3Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Nationwide Children's Hospital/The Ohio State University; Center for Innovation in Pediatric Practice, Abigail Wexner Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, OH.

4Division of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, Nationwide Children's Hospital/The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH; Center for Innovation in Pediatric Practice, Abigail Wexner Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, OH. Electronic address: Sarah.OBrien@nationwidechildrens.org.

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate trends in diagnosis and management of iron deficiency anemia using a large national children's hospital database in pediatric patients admitted with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).

Study design: In this retrospective multicenter cohort study, we used the Pediatric Health Information System de-identified administrative database. Patients age <21 years with ≥2 admissions with International Classification of Disease, Ninth Revision and Tenth Revision codes for Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis from 2012 to 2018 were included. We extracted data regarding diagnoses of anemia and/or iron deficiency, and receipt of oral iron, intravenous (IV) iron, and/or blood transfusion. Data were analyzed descriptively.

Results: We identified 8007 unique patients meeting study criteria for a total of 28 260 admissions. The median age at admission was 15.4 years. A diagnosis of anemia was documented in 29.8% of admissions and iron studies were performed in 12.6%. IV iron was given in 6.3% of admissions and blood transfusions in 7.4%. The prevalence of the diagnosis of anemia among IBD admissions increased from 24.6% in 2012 to 32.4% in 2018 (P < .0001). There was a steady increase in the proportion of IBD admissions that used IV iron, from 3.5% in 2012 to 10.4% in 2018 (P < .0001), and the proportion of admissions with red cell transfusions decreased over time from 9.4% to 4.4% (P < .0001).

Conclusions: Iron deficiency anemia is prevalent among pediatric patients with IBD admitted to US children's hospitals. From 2012 to 2018, there was an increase in the use of inpatient IV iron for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia and a decrease in transfusions.

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