Abstract

Prevalence of Rome IV Functional Bowel Disorders Among Adults in the United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom

Palsson OS1, Whitehead W2, Törnblom H3, Sperber AD4, Simren M5. Gastroenterology. 2020 Jan 7. pii: S0016-5085(20)30001-9. doi: 10.1053/j.gastro.2019.12.021. [Epub ahead of print]

 
     

Author information

Center for Functional GI & Motility Disorders, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina. Electronic address: opalsson@med.unc.edu.

Center for Functional GI & Motility Disorders, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.

Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel.

Center for Functional GI & Motility Disorders, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina; Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.

Abstract

BACKGROUND & AIMS: Little is known about the population prevalence or demographic distributions of Rome IV functional bowel disorders (FBDs) or their effects on quality of life. We examined these in a multinational survey.

METHODS: We analyzed data from a population-based survey of adults in the United States, Canada, and United Kingdom (5931 valid responders; 49.2% female; mean age, 47.4 years; range, 18-92 years). The survey included the Rome IV Diagnostic Questionnaire, Rome III irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and constipation questions, and the SF-8 quality of life questionnaire.

RESULTS: The prevalence values of census-adjusted Rome IV FBDs were similar among the 3 countries; ranges were: 4.4%-4.8% for IBS, 7.9%-8.6% for functional constipation, 3.6%-5.3% for functional diarrhea, 2.0%-3.9% for functional bloating or distention, 1.1%-1.9% for opioid-induced constipation, 7.5%-10.0% for unspecified FBDs, and 28.6%-31.7% for any Rome IV FBD. FBDs were less common in older individuals, and all except functional diarrhea were more common in women. IBS was only half as prevalent by Rome IV as by Rome III criteria (4.6% vs 9.0% overall), primarily due to higher Rome IV minimum pain frequency. Functional diarrhea and functional constipation were more prevalent by Rome IV than Rome III criteria. Subjects with FBD had significant reductions in quality of life and reported more gastrointestinal doctor consultations than other subjects.

CONCLUSIONS: More than 1 in 4 adults in the general population meet the Rome IV criteria for FBDs. These disorders affect quality of life and increase use of gastrointestinal health care. The switch from Rome III to Rome IV criteria reduces the prevalence of IBS by half, but increases the prevalence of functional constipation and functional diarrhea.

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