Abstract

Decreasing Colectomy Rate for Ulcerative Colitis in the United States Between 2007 and 2016: A Time Trend Analysis

Barnes EL1,2,3, Jiang Y4, Kappelman MD2,3,5, Long MD1,2,3, Sandler RS1,3, Kinlaw AC6,7, Herfarth HH1,2,3. Inflamm Bowel Dis. 2019 Oct 21. pii: izz247. doi: 10.1093/ibd/izz247. [Epub ahead of print]

 
     

Author information

Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA.

Multidisciplinary Center for Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA.

Center for Gastrointestinal Biology and Disease, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA.

Department of Biostatistics, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA.

Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA.

Division of Pharmaceutical Outcomes and Policy, Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA.

Cecil G. Sheps Center for Health Services Research, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Improved treatment approaches for ulcerative colitis (UC), including novel medications, might reduce the need for colectomy. We performed a retrospective cohort study of adult patients (age 18-64) with UC in the United States to examine time trends for colectomy and biologic use from 2007 to 2016.

METHODS: We estimated quarterly rates for colectomy and biologic use using the IQVIA Legacy PharMetrics Adjudicated Claims Database. We used interrupted time series methods with segmented regression to assess time trends with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for biologic use and colectomy before and after the emergence of newly available biologic therapies in 2014.

RESULTS: Among 93,930 patients with UC, 2275 (2.4%) underwent colectomy from 2007 to 2016. Biologic use rates increased significantly from 2007 to 2016, from 131 per 1000 person-years in 2007 (95% CI, 121 to 140) to 589 per 1000 person-years in 2016 (95% CI, 575 to 604; P < 0.001). Colectomy rates decreased significantly between 2007 and 2016, from 7.8 per 1000 person-years (95% CI, 7.4 to 8.2) to 4.2 per 1000 person-years in 2016 (95% CI, 3.2 to 5.1; P < 0.001). An interruption in 2014 was associated with a positive trend deflection for biologic use (+72 treatments per 1000 person-years per year (95% CI, 61 to 83) and a negative trend deflection for colectomy (-0.76 per 1000 person-years per year; 95% CI, -1.47 to -0.05).

CONCLUSIONS: Among commercially insured patients in the United States from 2007 to 2016, biologic use rates increased, colectomy rates decreased, and both trends were impacted by the interruption in 2014. These findings suggest that new biologic therapies may have contributed to decreased colectomy rates.

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