Abstract

Intestinal Inflammation Promotes MDL-1 +Osteoclast Precursor Expansion to Trigger Osteoclastogenesis and Bone Loss

Cell Mol Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2022 Jul 12;S2352-345X(22)00160-6.doi: 10.1016/j.jcmgh.2022.07.002. Online ahead of print.

 

Christopher T Peek 1Caleb A Ford 2Kara R Eichelberger 3Justin Jacobse 4Teresa P Torres 1Damian Maseda 5Yvonne L Latour 1M Blanca Piazuelo 6Joshua R Johnson 7Mariana X Byndloss 8Keith T Wilson 9Jeffrey C Rathmell 10Jeremy A Goettel 11James E Cassat 12

 
     

Author information

1Department of Pathology, Microbiology, and Immunology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee.

2Department of Biomedical Engineering, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee.

3Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee.

4Department of Pathology, Microbiology, and Immunology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee; Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee.

5Department of Pathology, Microbiology, and Immunology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee; Department of Dermatology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

6Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee; Center for Mucosal Inflammation and Cancer, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee.

7Vanderbilt Center for Bone Biology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee.

8Department of Pathology, Microbiology, and Immunology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee; Vanderbilt Institute for Infection, Immunology, and Inflammation, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee.

9Department of Pathology, Microbiology, and Immunology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee; Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee; Vanderbilt Institute for Infection, Immunology, and Inflammation, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee; Center for Mucosal Inflammation and Cancer, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee; Veterans Affairs Tennessee Valley Healthcare System, Nashville, Tennessee.

10Department of Pathology, Microbiology, and Immunology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee; Vanderbilt Institute for Infection, Immunology, and Inflammation, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee; Center for Mucosal Inflammation and Cancer, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee; Vanderbilt Center for Immunobiology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee.

11Department of Pathology, Microbiology, and Immunology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee; Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee; Vanderbilt Institute for Infection, Immunology, and Inflammation, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee; Center for Mucosal Inflammation and Cancer, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee.

12Department of Pathology, Microbiology, and Immunology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee; Department of Biomedical Engineering, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee; Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee; Vanderbilt Institute for Infection, Immunology, and Inflammation, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee; Center for Mucosal Inflammation and Cancer, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee; Vanderbilt Center for Immunobiology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee; Vanderbilt Center for Bone Biology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee. Electronic address: jim.cassat@vumc.org.

Abstract

Background & aims: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by severe gastrointestinal inflammation, but many patients experience extra-intestinal disease. Bone loss is one common extra-intestinal manifestation of IBD that occurs through dysregulated interactions between osteoclasts and osteoblasts. Systemic inflammation has been postulated to contribute to bone loss, but the specific pathologic mechanisms have not yet been fully elucidated. We hypothesized that intestinal inflammation leads to bone loss through increased abundance and altered function of osteoclast progenitors.

Methods: We used chemical, T cell driven, and infectious models of intestinal inflammation to determine the impact of intestinal inflammation on bone volume, the skeletal cytokine environment, and the cellular changes to pre-osteoclast populations within bone marrow. Additionally, we evaluated the potential for monoclonal antibody treatment against an inflammation-induced osteoclast co-receptor, myeloid DNAX activation protein 12-associating lectin-1 (MDL-1) to reduce bone loss during colitis.

Results: We observed significant bone loss across all models of intestinal inflammation. Bone loss was associated with an increase in pro-osteoclastogenic cytokines within the bone and an expansion of a specific Cd11b-/loLy6Chi osteoclast precursor (OCP) population. Intestinal inflammation led to altered OCP expression of surface receptors involved in osteoclast differentiation and function, including the pro-osteoclastogenic co-receptor MDL-1. OCPs isolated from mice with intestinal inflammation demonstrated enhanced osteoclast differentiation ex vivo compared to controls, which was abrogated by anti-MDL-1 antibody treatment. Importantly, in vivo anti-MDL-1 antibody treatment ameliorated bone loss during intestinal inflammation.

Conclusions: Collectively, these data implicate the pathologic expansion and altered function of OCPs expressing MDL-1 in bone loss during IBD.

 

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