Abstract

The Cumulative Incidence of Pouchitis in Pediatric Patients With Ulcerative Colitis

Inflamm Bowel Dis. 2022 Jan 18;izab320. doi: 10.1093/ibd/izab320. Online ahead of print.

Ellen Cowherd 1, Matthew D Egberg 2 3 4, Michael D Kappelman 2 3 4, Xian Zhang 3, Millie D Long 2 3 5, Amy L Lightner 6, Robert S Sandler 3 5, Hans H Herfarth 2 3 5, Edward L Barnes 2 3 5

 
     

Author information

1Department of Pediatrics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.

2Multidisciplinary Center for Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.

3Center for Gastrointestinal Biology and Disease, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.

4Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.

5Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USAand.

6Digestive Disease and Surgery Institute, Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio, USA.

Abstract

Background: Despite highly effective therapies, many children develop medically refractory ulcerative colitis (UC) and undergo proctocolectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (IPAA). We sought to determine the incidence, risk, and burden of pouchitis in the first 2 years following the final stage of IPAA in pediatric UC patients.

Methods: Within the IQVIA Legacy PharMetrics Adjudicated Claims Database, we identified pediatric patients with UC who underwent proctocolectomy with IPAA between January 1, 2007, and June 30, 2015. We utilized International Classification of Diseases-Ninth Revision-Clinical Modification or International Classification of Diseases-Tenth Revision-Clinical Modification codes to identify patients with UC and Current Procedural Terminology codes to identify colectomy and IPAA. Continuous variables were compared using t tests and Wilcoxon rank sum testing, while categorical variables were compared using chi-square testing.

Results: A total of 68 patients with an IPAA were identified. In the first 2 years following IPAA, the cumulative incidence of pouchitis was 54%. Patients with pouchitis required more outpatient visits in the first 2 years after IPAA (mean 21.8 vs 10.2; P = .006) and were more likely to be hospitalized compared with patients without pouchitis (46% vs 23%; P = .045). Patients with pouchitis also demonstrated higher mean total costs in year 1 and year 2 ($27 489 vs $8032 [P = .001] and $27 699 vs $6058 [P = .003], respectively).

Conclusions: Our findings confirm the high incidence of pouchitis demonstrated in earlier single-center studies of pediatric patients undergoing proctocolectomy with IPAA for UC. Identification of risk factors for pouchitis would be useful to optimize early intervention.

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