Abstract

The Use of Linaclotide in Children with Functional Constipation or Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Retrospective Chart Review

Paediatr Drugs. 2021 Apr 20. doi: 10.1007/s40272-021-00444-4. Online ahead of print.

Desiree F Baaleman # 1 2, Shivani Gupta # 3, Marc A Benninga 4, Neetu Bali 3, Karla H Vaz 3, Desale Yacob 3, Carlo Di Lorenzo 3, Peter L Lu 3

 
     

Author information

  • 1Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Department of Pediatrics, Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, OH, USA. d.f.baaleman@amsterdamumc.nl.
  • 2Emma Children's Hospital, Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, Pediatric Gastroenterology, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. d.f.baaleman@amsterdamumc.nl.
  • 3Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Department of Pediatrics, Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, OH, USA.
  • 4Emma Children's Hospital, Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, Pediatric Gastroenterology, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

#Contributed equally.

Abstract

Background: Linaclotide is a well-tolerated and effective agent for adults with functional constipation (FC) or irritable bowel syndrome with constipation (IBS-C). However, data in children are lacking. The aim of this study is to examine the efficacy and safety of linaclotide in children.

Methods: We performed a retrospective review of children < 18 years old who started linaclotide at our institution (Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio). We excluded children already using linaclotide or whom had an organic cause of constipation or abdominal pain. We recorded information on patient characteristics, medical and surgical history, symptoms, clinical response, course of treatment, and adverse events at baseline, first follow-up, and after 1 year of linaclotide use. A positive clinical response was based on the physician's global assessment of symptoms at the time of the visit as documented.

Results: We included 93 children treated with linaclotide for FC (n = 60) or IBS-C (n = 33); 60% were female; median age was 14.7 years (IQR 13.2-16.6). Forty-five percent of patients with FC and 42% with IBS-C had a positive clinical response at first follow-up a median of 2.5 and 2.4 months after starting linaclotide, respectively. Approximately a third of patients experienced adverse events and eventually 27% stopped using linaclotide due to adverse events. The most common adverse events were diarrhea, abdominal pain, nausea, and bloating.

Conclusion: Nearly half of children with FC or IBS-C benefited from linaclotide, but adverse events were relatively common. Further prospective, controlled studies are needed to confirm these findings and to identify which patients are most likely to benefit from linaclotide.

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