Abstract

Black/African American Patients with Pediatric Crohn's Disease Report Less Anxiety and Fatigue than White Patients

J Pediatr. 2020 Oct;225:146-151. doi: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2020.05.042.Epub 2020 Jun 14.

Arielle Grossman 1, Elizabeth Mauer 2, Linda M Gerber 2, Millie D Long 3, Michael D Kappelman 4, Neera Gupta 5

 
     

Author information

  • 1Department of Pediatrics, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, NY.
  • 2Department of Healthcare Policy and Research, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, NY.
  • 3Department of Internal Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC; Center for Gastrointestinal Biology and Disease, Chapel Hill, NC.
  • 4Department of Pediatrics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC; Center for Gastrointestinal Biology and Disease, Chapel Hill, NC.
  • 5Department of Pediatrics, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, NY. Electronic address: neg9020@med.cornell.edu.

Abstract

Objectives: To compare patient-reported outcomes in black/African American patients with white patients participating in IBD Partners Kids & Teens, in order to identify possible racial healthcare disparities in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) as future targets for improvement.

Study design: This was a cross-sectional analysis comparing patient-reported outcomes in black/African American patients with white patients, aged 9-18 years, with IBD participating in the IBD Partners Kids & Teens cohort from August 2013 to April 2018. Secondary outcomes included number of IBD-related hospitalizations and surgeries, current medication use, and disease activity.

Results: We included 401 patients with Crohn's disease (white = 378 [94%]; black/African American = 23 [6%]). For children with Crohn's disease, black/African American patients compared with white patients reported less anxiety (40.7 vs 47.5, P = .001) and fatigue (44.3 vs 48.4, P = .047) despite more frequently reported treatment with biologics (91% vs 61%, P = .006) and antibiotics (17% vs 5%, P = .03) and history of hospitalizations (81% vs 52%, P = .02).

Conclusions: Black/African American children with Crohn's disease were less likely to report anxiety or fatigue than white patients, despite an apparent more severe disease course reflected by greater reported frequency of treatment with biologics and antibiotics and history of hospitalizations.

© Copyright 2013-2021 GI Health Foundation. All rights reserved.
This site is maintained as an educational resource for US healthcare providers only. Use of this website is governed by the GIHF terms of use and privacy statement.