Abstract

Safety and efficacy of sucrosomial iron in inflammatory bowel disease patients with iron deficiency anemia

Abbati G1, Incerti F2, Boarini C2, Pileri F2, Bocchi D2, Ventura P2, Buzzetti Intern Emerg Med. 2018 Nov 29. doi: 10.1007/s11739-018-1993-9. [Epub ahead of print] E2, Pietrangelo A2.
 
     

Author information

1 Division of Internal Medicine 2 and Center for Hemochromatosis, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Via DEL Pozzo 71, 41124, Modena, Italy. abbati.gl@unimore.it.

2 Division of Internal Medicine 2 and Center for Hemochromatosis, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Via DEL Pozzo 71, 41124, Modena, Italy.

Abstract

Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is one of the most common complications of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We planned a prospective study to address tolerability and efficacy of sucrosomial iron, a new oral formulation of ferric pyrophosphate, in IBDpatients. Thirty patients with a confirmed diagnosis of Crohn's Disease (CD) or ulcerative colitis (UC) and mild IDA were enrolled. Patients with severe IBD were excluded. All patients underwent 12 weeks of oral treatment with 30 mg/day of sucrosomial iron. Treatment compliance and adverse events were investigated every 4 weeks. Iron status, hematological parameters and IBD activity scores were determined at baseline and at the end of treatment, as well as serum hepcidin and non-transferrin bound iron (NTBI) levels. Twenty-four (80%) patients took more than 90% of the prescribed regimen. Forty-four adverse events (AEs) were recorded, but none of them is considered certainly or probably related to the study treatment. Interestingly, only eleven gastrointestinal events were recorded in 9 (30%) patients. At the end of treatment, all iron parameters improved significantly and Hb increased in 86% of patients (from 11.67 to 12.37 g/dl, p = 0.001). Serum hepcidin showed a significant increase in 79% of patients and became positively correlated with C-reactive protein (CRP) at the end of the study, while NTBI remained below the detection threshold after iron supplementation. The IBD activity scores improved in both CD and UC. This pilot interventional study supports the therapeutic use of sucrosomial iron in IBD and paves the way for future studies in larger or more difficult IBD populations.

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