Abstract

Co-occurrence of Asthma and the Inflammatory Bowel Diseases: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

Kuenzig ME1, Bishay K2, Leigh R3, Kaplan GG3,4, Benchimol EI5,6; Crowdscreen SR Review Team. Clin Transl Gastroenterol. 2018 Sep 24;9(9):188. doi: 10.1038/s41424-018-0054-z.
 
     

Author information

1 Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO) Inflammatory Bowel Disease Centre, Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology & Nutrition, Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Ottawa, Canada. mkuenzig@cheo.on.ca.

2 Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada.

3 Department of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada.

4 Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada.

5 Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO) Inflammatory Bowel Disease Centre, Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology & Nutrition, Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Ottawa, Canada.

6 Department of Pediatrics and School of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) and asthma share genetic and environmental risk factors. Consequently, several observational studies have explored an association between IBD and asthma. We systematically reviewed and summarized the literature on the co-occurrence of asthma and IBD.

METHODS: MEDLINE and EMBASE (to April 2017) were searched to identify observational studies on the association between asthma and IBD. Relative risks (RR) were pooled using random effects models. Heterogeneity was assessed using the I2 and Cochran Q statistics. Meta-regression based on study design, source of patients (population-based vs. tertiary-care center) and study location was conducted to explain between-study heterogeneity.

RESULTS: Eighteen studies were identified (15 Crohn's disease, 15 ulcerative colitis (UC)). Asthma was associated with both Crohn's disease (pooled RR 1.30, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.16-1.47, I2 = 88%) and UC (RR 1.34, 95% CI 1.24-1.44, I2 = 93%). The study design and source of patients and study location explained between-study heterogeneity in Crohn's disease, but not UC.

CONCLUSION: Asthma is associated with both Crohn's disease and UC. Additional research is needed to determine if one diseaseinfluences the risk of developing the other or if the frequent co-occurrence of these diseases result from shared genetic, environmental, and microbial risk factors.

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