Abstract

Premedication as primary prophylaxis does not influence the risk of acute infliximab infusion reactions in immune-mediated inflammatory diseases: A systematic review and meta-analysis

Fumery M1, Tilmant M2, Yzet C2, Brazier F2, Loreau J2, Turpin J2, Le Mouel JP2, Goeb V3, Nguyen-Khac E2, Singh S4, Dupas JL2, Diouf M5. Dig Liver Dis. 2018 Dec 13. pii: S1590-8658(18)31277-5. doi: 10.1016/j.dld.2018.12.002. [Epub ahead of print]
 
     

Author information

1 Gastroenterology, Amiens University Hospital, Université de Picardie Jules Verne, Amiens, France, France. Electronic address: Fumery.mathurin@chu-amiens.fr.

2 Gastroenterology, Amiens University Hospital, Université de Picardie Jules Verne, Amiens, France, France.

3 Rheumatology, Amiens University Hospital, Université de Picardie Jules Verne, Amiens, France.

4 Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, UC San Diego Health System, La Jolla, USA.

5 Department of Biostatistics, Amiens University Hospital, Amiens, France.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Up to 25% of patients treated with infliximab experience hypersensitivity reactions. Prophylactic premedication prior to infliximab infusion, comprising corticosteroids and/or antihistamines, is widely used in clinical practice but its efficacy has recently been called into question due to the lack of pathophysiological rationale and validation by controlled trials.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: We conducted a comprehensive literature search of multiple electronic databases from inception to June 2017 to identify studies reporting the impact of corticosteroid and/or antihistamine premedication on the risk of acute (<24 h) hypersensitivity reaction to infliximab in immune-mediated inflammatory diseases (IMIDs). Random-effects meta-analysis was performed.

RESULTS: Ten studies, eight observational studies and two randomized control trials, were identified including a total of 3892 patients with IMIDs, and 1,385 patients with IBD. Corticosteroid premedication was not associated with a decreased risk of hypersensitivity reaction in either IMIDs (7 studies; OR, 1.07, 95%CI, 0.64-1.78; I2 = 57.5%) or IBD (3 studies; OR, 1.04, 95% CI, 0.52-2.07; I2 = 57%). Antihistamine premedication was not associated with a decreased risk of hypersensitivity reaction in IMIDs (3 studies: OR, 1.39, 95% CI, 0.70-2.73; I2 = 85%). The combination of corticosteroids and antihistamines did not decrease the risk of acute infliximab infusion reaction in IMIDs (6 studies; OR, 2.12, 95% CI, 0.61-7.35; I2 = 94%), but was associated with an increased risk in IBD (4 studies, OR, 4.17, 95% CI, 1.61-10.78; I2 = 77%).

CONCLUSION: Corticosteroid and/or antihistamine premedication is not associated with a decreased risk of acute hypersensitivity reactions to infliximab in patients with IMIDs. We believe that these premedications should no longer be part of standard protocols.

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