Abstract

High Patient Activation Is Associated With Remission in Patients With Inflammatory BowelDisease

Barnes EL1,2, Long MD1,2,3, Kappelman MD2,3,4, Martin CF1,3, Sandler RS1,3. Inflamm Bowel Dis. 2018 Dec 22. doi: 10.1093/ibd/izy378. [Epub ahead of print]
 
     

Author information

1 Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

2 Multidisciplinary Center for Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

3 Center for Gastrointestinal Biology and Disease, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

4 Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: High levels of patient activation (having the knowledge, skills, and confidence to effectively manage one's care), have been associated with improved outcomes in many chronic conditions. There have been few studies of the effects of activation in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We performed a large, prospective Internet-based study to assess the relationship between patient activation level and clinical remission in patients with Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis.

METHODS: We administered the Patient Activation Measure (Insignia Health) to 1486 cohort participants. Patients completed a follow-up survey within 13 months (median, 189 days). We collected demographic and clinical data; anxiety and depression were assessed using Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System instruments. We used bivariate analyses and multivariable logistic regression to identify characteristics associated with low or high patient activation and to evaluate the association between levels of patient activation and subsequent disease activity.

RESULTS: Higher anxiety (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 0.32; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.29-0.36) and depression (aOR, 0.33; 95% CI, 0.29-0.37) scores were associated with a decreased odds of high patient activation. After we adjusted for education status, smoking, medication use, and other confounders, we found that patients with high activation at baseline were more likely to be in clinical remission during the follow-up period (aOR, 1.71; 95% CI, 1.20-2.45).

CONCLUSIONS: In a large, prospective Internet-based cohort of patients with IBD, we found a strong association between patient activation and clinical remission. These findings suggest that patient activation affects disease outcomes.

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