Abstract

Vitamin D status in irritable bowel syndrome and the impact of supplementation on symptoms: what do we know and what do we need to know?

Williams CE1, Williams EA2, Corfe BM3,4. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2018 Jan 25. doi: 10.1038/s41430-017-0064-z. [Epub ahead of print]
 
     

Author information

1 Molecular Gastroenterology Research Group, Academic Unit of Surgical Oncology, Department of Oncology & Metabolism, University of Sheffield, Beech Hill Road, Sheffield, S10 2RX, UK.

2 Department of Oncology & Metabolism, Human Nutrition Unit, University of Sheffield, Beech Hill Road, Sheffield, S10 2RX, UK.

3 Molecular Gastroenterology Research Group, Academic Unit of Surgical Oncology, Department of Oncology & Metabolism, University of Sheffield, Beech Hill Road, Sheffield, S10 2RX, UK. b.m.corfe@sheffield.ac.uk.

4 Insigneo Institute for In Silico Medicine, The University of Sheffield, Sheffield, S10 2RX, UK. b.m.corfe@sheffield.ac.uk.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Low vitamin D status is associated with risk of colorectal cancer and has been implicated in inflammatory bowel disease. Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a chronic, relapsing, functional bowel disorder. A nascent literature suggests a role for vitamin D in IBS, but this has not been collated or critiqued. To date, seven studies have been published: four observational studies and three randomised controlled trials (RCTs). All observational studies reported that a substantial proportion of the IBS population was vitamin D deficient. Two intervention studies reported improvement in IBS symptom severity scores and quality of life (QoL) with vitamin D supplementation. There are limited data around the role of vitamin D in IBS.

CONCLUSIONS: The available evidence suggests that low vitamin D status is common among the IBS population and merits assessment and rectification for general health reasons alone. An inverse correlation between serum vitamin D and IBS symptom severity is suggested and vitamin D interventions may benefit symptoms. However, the available RCTs do not provide strong, generalisable evidence; larger and adequately powered interventions are needed to establish a case for therapeutic application of vitamin D in IBS.

© Copyright 2013-2018 GI Health Foundation. All rights reserved.
This site is maintained as an educational resource for US healthcare providers only. Use of this website is governed by the GIHF terms of use and privacy statement.