Abstract

Chronic Urticaria and Irritable Bowel Syndrome: a Cross-Sectional Study of 11,271 Patients

Shalom G1,2, Magen E2,3,4, Babaev M2, Horev A1,2, Freud T5, Ben Yakov G2,6, Comaneshter D7, Vardy DA1,2, Cohen AD5,7. Br J Dermatol. 2017 Sep 14. doi: 10.1111/bjd.15997. [Epub ahead of print]
 
     
Author information

1 Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Soroka Medical Center, Beer-Sheva, Israel. 2 Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel. 3 Medicine C Department, Allergy and Clinical Immunology Unit, Barzilai Medical Center, Ben-Gurion University of Negev, Ashkelon, Israel. 4 Leumit Health Services, Israel. 5 Siaal Research Center for Family Medicine and Primary Care, Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel. 6 Institute for Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Soroka Medical Center, Beer-Sheva, Israel. 7 Chief Physician's Office, Department of Quality Measurements and Research, Clalit Health Services, Tel-Aviv, Israel.

Abstract

The human body interacts with the environment mainly through three major tissues: the lungs, skin, and gastrointestinal (GI) tract. In each one, an intensive nervous network is present, conjugated with abundant mast cells (MC). While MC-mediated disorders in airways and the skin are extensively discussed, MC-mediated disorders of the GI tract remain relatively uncommon. Since the GI tract is one of the three main environment-interacting tissues, it is reasonable that MC-mediated disorders of the GI may have the same weight and impact as asthma or chronic urticaria (CU).

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