Abstract

Irritable brain caused by irritable bowel? A nationwide analysis for irritable bowel syndrome and risk of bipolar disorder

Liu CJ1, Hu LY2, Yeh CM3, Hu YW4, Chen PM5, Chen TJ6, Lu T2. PLoS One. 2015 Mar 13;10(3):e0118209. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0118209. eCollection 2015.
 
     
Author information

1Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; Institute of Public Health & School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan. 2Department of Psychiatry, Kaohsiung Veterans General Veterans Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan. 3Department of Family Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. 4Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; Cancer Center, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. 5Department of Psychiatry, Yuanshan & Suao Branch, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Yilan, Taiwan. 6Department of Psychiatry, Yuanshan & Suao Branch, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Yilan, Taiwan; School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: We explored the association between IBS and the development of bipolar disorder, and the risk factors for bipolar disorders in patients with IBS.

METHODS: We identified patients who were newly diagnosed with IBS between 2000 and 2010 in the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. We also identified a comparison matched cohort without IBS. The occurrence of new-onset bipolar disorder was evaluated in both cohorts.

RESULTS: The IBS cohort consisted of 30,796 patients and the comparison cohort consisted of 30,796 matched patients without IBS. The incidence of bipolar disorder (incidence rate ratio, 2.63, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.10-3.31, P < .001) was higher in the IBS patients than in the matched cohort. Multivariate matched regression models indicated that autoimmune diseases (HR 1.52, 95% CI 1.07-2.17, P = .020), and asthma (HR 1.45, 95% CI 1.08-1.95, P = .013) were independent risk factors for the development of bipolar disorder in the IBS patients.

CONCLUSION: IBS may increase the risk of developing subsequent bipolar disorder. Additional prospective studies are required to confirm these findings.

© Copyright 2013-2017 GI Health Foundation. All rights reserved.
This site is maintained as an educational resource for US healthcare providers only. Use of this website is governed by the GIHF terms of use and privacy statement.