Abstract

Sleep Disturbances Are Commonly Reported Among Patients Presenting to a Gastroenterology Clinic

Ballou S1, Alhassan E1, Hon E1, Lembo C1, Rangan V1, Singh P1, Hirsch W1, Sommers T1, Iturrino J1, Nee J1, Lembo A2. Dig Dis Sci. 2018 Aug 9. doi: 10.1007/s10620-018-5237-7. [Epub ahead of print]
 
     

Author information

1 Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, 330 Brookline Avenue, Dana 501, Boston, MA, 02215, USA.

2 Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, 330 Brookline Avenue, Dana 501, Boston, MA, 02215, USA. alembo@bidmc.harvard.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Poor sleep quality is common among patients with gastrointestinal (GI) disorders. However, few studies have assessed the presence of insomnia or reported circadian preferences and none have directly compared sleep between common GI conditions.

AIMS: To compare clinical sleep characteristics in patients presenting to a tertiary care GI clinic for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), functional dyspepsia (FD), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), and celiac disease (CD).

METHODS: Validated sleep measures were administered to consecutive patients if they were diagnosed with IBS, IBD in clinical remission, CD, FD, or GERD. Healthy Controls (HCs) with no reported GI diagnoses or symptoms were also recruited.

RESULTS: A total of 212 eligible respondents completed this survey, 161 GI clinic patients (IBS (n = 48), GERD (n = 29), IBD in clinical remission (n = 44), CD (n = 40)), and 41 HCs. Only, 10 respondents had a diagnosis of FD, and these were excluded. The IBS group had the highest frequency of poor sleep (72%) followed by CD (61%), GERD (60%), IBD (54%), and HC (39%). IBS patients also had the highest frequency of clinical insomnia (51%), followed by GERD (37%), CD (35%), IBD (27%), and HC (18%). 40% of IBS patients reported taking sleep medications at least once per week, compared to 32% of GERD, 23% IBD, 13% CD, and 15% HC.

CONCLUSIONS: Patients presenting to a tertiary care GI clinic report poorer sleep than healthy controls. In general, patients with IBS report the highest rates of sleep difficulties compared to patients with other diagnoses.

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