Abstract

In Vitro Fertilization in Women with Inflammatory Bowel Disease is as Successful as inWomen from the General Infertility Population

Oza SS1, Pabby V2, Dodge LE3, Moragianni VA4, Hacker MR5, Fox JH6, Correia K7, Missmer SA8, Ibrahim Y9, Penzias AS10, Burakoff R11, Friedman S12, Cheifetz AS13. Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2015 Mar 25. pii: S1542-3565(15)00302-X. doi: 10.1016/j.cgh.2015.03.016. [Epub ahead of print]
 
     
Author information

1Clinical Fellow in Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School Boston, Massachusetts. 2Clinical Instructor, Division of Digestive Diseases David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA Los Angeles, California. 3Clinical Research Assistant, Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School Boston, Massachusetts. 4Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston Massachusetts. 5Vice Chair for Research, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. 6Assistant Professor of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Biology Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School Boston, Massachusetts. 7Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts. 8Associate Professor of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Biology, Associate Professor in Epidemiology, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School Boston, Massachusetts. 9Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. 10Director, Fellowship Program in Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center & Boston IVF Associate Professor of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology Harvard Medical School Boston, Massachusetts. 11Clinical Chief, Gastroenterology Division Brigham and Women's Hospital Associate Professor of Medicine Harvard Medical School Boston, Massachusetts. 12Associate Professor of Medicine Harvard Medical School Associate Physician Brigham and Women's Hospital Boston, Massachusetts. 13Director, Center for Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Associate Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School , Boston, Massachusetts. Electronic address: acheifet@bidmc.harvard.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND & AIMS: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) affects women of reproductive age, so there are concerns about its effects on fertility. We investigated the success of in vitro fertilization (IVF) in patients with IBD compared to the general (non-IBD) IVF population.

METHODS: We conducted a matched retrospective cohort study of female patients with IBD who underwent IVF from 1998 through 2011 at 2 tertiary care centers. Patients were matched 4:1 to those without IBD (controls). The primary outcome was cumulative rate of live birth after up to 6 cycles of IVF. Secondary outcomes included proportion of patients who became pregnant and rate of live birth for each cycle.

RESULTS: Forty-nine patients with Crohn's disease (CD), 71 patients with ulcerative colitis (UC), 1 patient with IBD-unclassified, and 470 controls underwent IVF during the study period. The cumulative rate of live birth was 53% for controls, 69% for patients with UC (P=.08 compared with controls), and 57% for patients with CD (P=.87 compared with controls). The incidence of pregnancy following the first cycle of IVF was similar among controls (40.9%), patients with UC (49.3%, P=.18), and patients with CD (42.9%, P=.79). Similarly, the incidence of live birth after the first cycle of IVF was similar among controls (30.2%), patients with UC (33.8%, P=.54) and patients with CD (30.6%, P=.95).

CONCLUSIONS: Based on a matched cohort study, infertile women with IBD achieve rates of live birth following IVF that are comparable to those of infertile women without IBD.

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