Abstract

Familial Risk of Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Population-Based Cohort Study 1977-2011

Moller FT1, Andersen V2, Wohlfahrt J3, Jess T4. Am J Gastroenterol. 2015 Mar 24. doi: 10.1038/ajg.2015.50. [Epub ahead of print]
 
     
Author information

11] Organ Center, Hospital of Southern Jutland, Aabenraa, Denmark [2] Institute of Regional Health Research-Center Sønderjylland, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark [3] Department of Epidemiology Research, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark. 21] Organ Center, Hospital of Southern Jutland, Aabenraa, Denmark [2] Institute of Regional Health Research-Center Sønderjylland, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark. 3Department of Epidemiology Research, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark. 41] Department of Epidemiology Research, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark [2] Department of Clinical Epidemiology, University of Aalborg, Aalborg, Denmark.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Estimates of familial risk of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), Crohn's disease (CD), and ulcerative colitis (UC) are needed for counseling of patients and could be used to target future prevention. We aimed to provide comprehensive population-based estimates of familial risk of IBD.

METHODS: The study encompassed the entire Danish population during 1977-2011 (N=8,295,773; 200 million person-years). From national registries, we obtained information on diagnosis date of IBD (N=45,780) and family ties. Using Poisson regression, we estimated incidence rate ratios (IRRs) of IBD in relatives of IBD cases compared with individuals with relatives of the same type without IBD.

RESULTS: The risk of CD was significantly increased in first-degree (IRR, 7.77; 95% confidence interval (CI), 7.05-8.56), second-degree (IRR, 2.44; 95% CI, 2.01-2.96), and third-degree relatives (IRR, 1.88; 95% CI, 1.30-2.71) to patients with CD, and was less pronounced in relatives to UC cases. Likewise, the risk of UC was increased in first-degree (IRR, 4.08; 95% CI, 3.81-4.38), second-degree (IRR, 1.85; 95% CI, 1.60-2.13), and third-degree relatives (IRR, 1.51; 95% CI, 1.07-2.12) of UC cases, and less pronounced in relatives of CD cases. IRRs increased with two or more IBD-affected relatives and were modified by age, with the highest family-related IRR observed in early life.

CONCLUSIONS: The risk of IBD is significantly increased in first -, second-, and third-degree relatives of IBD-affected cases, with up to 12% of all IBD cases being family cases. The risk is particularly pronounced in young individuals.

© Copyright 2013-2017 GI Health Foundation. All rights reserved.
This site is maintained as an educational resource for US healthcare providers only. Use of this website is governed by the GIHF terms of use and privacy statement.