Abstract

Classification of pediatric functional gastrointestinal disorders related to abdominal pain using Rome III vs. Rome IV criterions

Edwards T1, Friesen C2, Schurman JV3. BMC Gastroenterol. 2018 Mar 17;18(1):41. doi: 10.1186/s12876-018-0769-z.
 
     

Author information

1 Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Children's Mercy Kansas City, 2401 Gillham Road, Kansas City, MO, 64108, USA.

2 Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Children's Mercy Kansas City, 2401 Gillham Road, Kansas City, MO, 64108, USA. cfriesen@cmh.edu.

3 Division of Developmental and Behavioral Sciences, Children's Mercy Kansas City, 2401 Gillham Road, Kansas City, MO, 64108, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The primary purpose of this study was to compare Rome III and IV evaluation criteria for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), functional dyspepsia (FD), and an overlap syndrome consisting of both IBS and FD by assessing the frequency of each diagnosis in a population of children with chronic abdominal pain. Frequencies of Rome IV FD subtypes of postprandial distress syndrome (PDS) and epigastric pain syndrome(EPS) were determined and FD/IBS overlap symptom associations were also assessed.

METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional retrospective chart review of 106 pediatric patients who had completed standardized medical histories as part of their evaluation for chronic abdominal pain. The patients ranged from eight to 17 years of age and reported having abdominal pain at least weekly for 8 weeks. Patients whose evaluation revealed gastrointestinal disease were excluded. The patients' diagnoses were determined by a single pediatric gastroenterologist utilizing the specific criteria for Rome III and IV, respectively.

RESULTS: Patients were significantly more likely to be diagnosed with FD (84.9% vs. 52.8%), IBS (69.8% vs. 34%), and FD/IBS overlap (58.5% vs. 17.9%) by Rome IV criteria, as compared to Rome III criteria. With regard to Rome IV FD subtypes, 81.1% fulfilled criteria for PDS, 11.1% fulfilled criteria for EPS, 6.7% fulfilled criteria for both, and 1.1% did not fulfill criteria for either. Finally, we found an increased frequency of diarrhea and pain with eating in the overlap group compared to the non-overlap group of Rome III, while only an increased frequency of diarrhea was found in the overlap group compared to the non-overlap group of Rome IV.

CONCLUSIONS: Our data demonstrate that utilizing Rome IV criteria, as compared to Rome III, results in an increase in the diagnosis of FD, a two-fold increase in the diagnosis of IBS, and a three-fold increase in the diagnosis of FD/IBS overlap. Rome IV criteria appears to result in greater heterogeneity within diagnostic categories. It is important to determine whether Rome IV diagnoses are predictive of treatment response, and if so, whether assessing symptom variability within a diagnosis will enhance the ability to select patients for a particular treatment.

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