Abstract

Restless legs syndrome is a relevant comorbidity in patients with inflammatorybowel disease

Becker J1, Berger F1, Schindlbeck KA2,3, Poddubnyy D1, Koch PM2, Preiß JC1,4, Siegmund B1, Marzinzik F2, Maul J5,6. Int J Colorectal Dis. 2018 Apr 3. doi: 10.1007/s00384-018-3032-8. [Epub ahead of print]
 
     

Author information

1 Department of Medicine (Gastroenterology, Infectious Diseases, Rheumatology), Campus Benjamin Franklin, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany.

2 Department of Neurology, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany.

3 Center for Neurosciences, Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, NY, USA.

4 Gastroenterologie, Hepatologie und Diabetologie, Vivantes Klinikum Neukölln, Berlin, Germany.

5 Department of Medicine (Gastroenterology, Infectious Diseases, Rheumatology), Campus Benjamin Franklin, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany. jochen.maul@charite.de.

6 Gastroenterologie am Bayerischen Platz, Innsbrucker Str. 58, 10825, Berlin, Germany. jochen.maul@charite.de.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: In patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), restless legs syndrome (RLS) may occur as an extraintestinal disease manifestation. Iron deficiency (ID) or folate deficiency/vitamin B12deficiency (FD/VB12D) has previously been described to cause RLS. Here, we determined the prevalence and severity of RLS in IBD patients and evaluated the effect of iron and/or folic acid/vitamin B12 supplementation.

METHODS: Patients were screened for ID and RLS by a gastroenterologist. If RLS was suspected, a neurologist was consulted for definitive diagnosis and severity. Patients with RLS and ID, FD, or VB12D received supplementation and were followed-up at weeks 4 and 11 after starting supplementation.

RESULTS: A total of 353 IBD patients were included. Prevalence for RLS was 9.4% in Crohn's disease (CD) and 8% in ulcerative colitis (UC). Prevalence for the subgroup of clinically relevant RLS (symptoms ≥ twice/week with at least moderate distress) was 7.1% (n = 16) for CD and 4.8% (n = 6) for UC. 38.7% of RLS patients presented with ID, FD, and/or VB12D. Most frequently ID was seen (25.8%; n = 8). Iron supplementation resulted in RLS improvement (p = 0.029) at week 4 in seven out of eight patients.

CONCLUSION: Although the overall prevalence of RLS in IBD did not differ to the general population, clinically relevant RLS was more frequent in IBD patients and, therefore, it is important for clinicians to be aware of RLS symptoms. Though for definite diagnosis and proper treatment of RLS, a neurologist must be consulted. Additionally, iron supplementation of IBD patients with ID can improve RLS symptoms.

TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov No. NCT03457571.

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