Abstract

Minority Pediatric Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease Demonstrate an Increased Length of Stay

Barnes EL1, Kochar B, Long MD, Martin CF, Kappelman MD. Inflamm Bowel Dis. 2017 Dec;23(12):2189-2196. doi: 10.1097/MIB.0000000000001267.
 
     
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1 *Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina;†Center for Gastrointestinal Biology and Disease, Chapel Hill, North Carolina; and‡Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Genetic and other biological factors may lead to differences in disease behavior among children with inflammatory bowel disease of different races, which may be further modified by disparities in care delivery. Using the Kids' Inpatient Database, we aimed to evaluate differences in the management of pediatric patients with inflammatory bowel disease by race, focusing on length of stay (LOS).

METHODS: We performed a cross-sectional analysis using 2000 to 2012 data from the Kids' Inpatient Database, a nationally representative database. We identified pediatric patients (≤18 years of age) with discharge diagnoses of Crohn's disease (CD) or ulcerative colitis (UC). We used multivariable logistic regression to evaluate the relationship between race and LOS, controlling for age, payer status need for surgery, and year of admission.

RESULTS: We identified 27,295 hospitalizations for children with inflammatory bowel disease (62% CD and 38% UC), Compared with white patients with CD, black (adjusted odds ratio 1.37; 95% confidence interval, 1.22-1.53; P < 0.001) and Hispanic patients (adjusted odds ratio: 1.37; 95% confidence interval: 1.19-1.59; P < 0.001) with CD demonstrated increased odds of a LOS greater than the 75th percentile. When compared with white patients with UC, Hispanic patients also demonstrated increased odds of a LOS greater than the 75th percentile (adjusted odds ratio: 1.20; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.42, P = 0.015).

CONCLUSIONS: After controlling for age, year of admission, and clinical phenotypes, black and Hispanic patients with CD and Hispanic patients with UC had longer LOS than white patients. These may be due to differences in provider/hospital characteristics, socioeconomic differences, and/or differences in genetics and other biological factors (see Video Abstract, Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/IBD/B656).

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