Brent A Parnell, MD
Georgia Regents University
Augusta, GA

Dr. Brent Parnell is a board-certified Urogynecologist and received his fellowship training in Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery from UNC-Chapel Hill School of Medicine. He is one of only two Urogynecologists in the Augusta area who perform da Vinci surgery for prolapse. He has performed over 100 procedures in his career. Dr. Parnell brings vast knowledge and expertise in female incontinence solutions and reconstructive surgery. In 2008, he received the Golden Scalpel award for being judged the best overall surgeon. He has also received an award for his outstanding patient care. Among his interests are urinary incontinence, fecal incontinence, pelvic organ prolapse, overactive bladder, and minimally invasive surgery, including robotic, laparoscopic, and vaginal.

Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery specializes in providing academic education and providing laparoscopic and minimally invasive surgery for most gynecology indications, including complete laparoscopic hysterectomy and minimally invasive procedures for incontinence and vaginal prolapse.

We offer the latest in surgical technology, including our newest addition, the da Vinci surgery instrument. da Vinci provides live 3-D images of the operation area while using precise robotic arms that allow the patient to experience less pain, less scarring, and shorter recovery time than prior surgical methods. da Vinci allows surgeons to sit in a more ergonomic position during surgery and to use their wrists, which could not be done in prior surgery techniques. The da Vinci instrument was demonstrated to community physicians and was also featured on News Channel 6 in September 2011. Click on the video below to find out more about da Vinci.

 Obstetric sphincter injury interacts with diarrhea and urgency to increase the risk of fecal incontinence in women with irritable bowel syndrome.

 Permanent Versus Absorbable Colpopexy Trial (PACT)

The primary aim of this randomized controlled trial (RCT) is to compare vaginal mesh and suture exposure rates in women undergoing robotic total hysterectomy and sacrocolpopexy with a light-weight polypropylene mesh (Upsylon™ y-mesh) using permanent (polytetrafluoroethylene, Gore-Tex) versus delayed absorbable monofilament (2-0 polydioxanone, PDS) sutures through 1-year.

Secondary Aims:
To compare the 1-year composite success rate (leading edge of prolapse is at or above the hymen and apex has descended less than 1/3 of the vaginal length, no subjective feeling of bulge; and no retreatment for pelvic organ prolapse (POP) or vaginal mesh exposure) of permanent versus delayed absorbable sutures for mesh graft attachment during robotic total hysterectomy and sacrocolpopexy.

To compare postoperative symptoms of pelvic floor disorders, including urinary incontinence, voiding dysfunction, pelvic organ prolapse, sexual dysfunction and quality of life between the 2 groups at 1 year.

To evaluate adverse outcomes in each group, classified according to the Clavien-Dindo system.

 Xenform Postmarket Surveillance Study

To compare transvaginal repair with a biologic mesh to traditional native tissue repair in women surgically treated for anterior/apical pelvic organ prolapse with or without concurrent cystocele.

Estimated Enrollment: 454
Study Start Date: February 2014
Estimated Study Completion Date: September 2018
Estimated Primary Completion Date: June 2018 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

    Webcasts

    Epidemiology, Burden of Illness and Diagnosis

    Anthony Lembo, MD

    Didactic Lecture

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    Clinical Advances in the Management of Fecal Incontinence

    Baharak Moshiree, MD

    Didactic Lecture

    view details >

    Biofeedback Therapy

    Satish Rao, MD

    Didactic Lecture

    view details >

    Neuromodulation for the Treatment of Fecal Incontinence

    Mitchell Bernstein, MD

    Didactic Lecture

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    Fecal Incontinence: Sphincteroplasty

    Andreas Kaiser, MD

    Didactic Lecture

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    Fecal Incontinence: Epidemiology & Burden of Illness

    Lucinda Harris, MD

    Didactic Lecture

    view details >

    Dietary and Lifestyle Management of Fecal Incontinence

    William Chey, MD

    Didactic Lecture

    view details >

    A Case of Fecal Incontinence: Medical and Interventional Treatment Options

    Darren Brenner, MD

    Case Study

    view details >

    Diagnostic Testing of Fecal Incontinence

    Satish Rao, MD

    Didactic Lecture

    view details >

    eMonograph

    Developing a Clinical Research Agenda for Fecal Incontinence

    view details >

    Webcasts

    Epidemiology, Burden of Illness and Diagnosis

    Anthony Lembo, MD

    Didactic Lecture

    view details >

    Clinical Advances in the Management of Fecal Incontinence

    Baharak Moshiree, MD

    Didactic Lecture

    view details >

    Biofeedback Therapy

    Satish Rao, MD

    Didactic Lecture

    view details >

    Neuromodulation for the Treatment of Fecal Incontinence

    Mitchell Bernstein, MD

    Didactic Lecture

    view details >

    Fecal Incontinence: Sphincteroplasty

    Andreas Kaiser, MD

    Didactic Lecture

    view details >

    Fecal Incontinence: Epidemiology & Burden of Illness

    Lucinda Harris, MD

    Didactic Lecture

    view details >

    Dietary and Lifestyle Management of Fecal Incontinence

    William Chey, MD

    Didactic Lecture

    view details >

    A Case of Fecal Incontinence: Medical and Interventional Treatment Options

    Darren Brenner, MD

    Case Study

    view details >

    Diagnostic Testing of Fecal Incontinence

    Satish Rao, MD

    Didactic Lecture

    view details >

    Dinner Meetings

    Clinical Advances in the Management of Fecal Incontinence
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